10 Ways changing your driving can save big bucks on your fuel bill.

Tweaking your behaviour behind the wheel can be a pain — but it could also save you minimum $500 or more in gas every year

Typically when drivers want to make drastic gains in their fuel efficiency, they’ll swap whatever gas-guzzler they’ve got with a less-thirsty alternative.

But you can save hundreds of dollars a year at the pump just by changing the way you drive. We’ve drafted this list of 10 tips that, collectively, should save you up to $500 or more in fuel per year, if applied properly and depending on your vehicle of course.

Some of these you might already know, some are just applied common sense, while some sound counter-intuitive. Like our first tip, for example…

Tip 1: Accelerate briskly

You’ve likely heard slow starts off the line at stoplights are one of the best ways to reduce your fuel consumption. Guess what? The longer you take to reach your cruising speed, the more you stretch the energy demand.

It’s actually better to accelerate adroitly — not peeling out or burning rubber, since, yes, your high-revving engine will make you pay at the pump later if you floor it. But applying about two-thirds throttle is perfect.

Does your car have a manual transmission? First gear should be used only to get the vehicle rolling, with a rapid gear change through all the following ratios to keep RPMs as low as possible. With some older automatic transmissions, shifting to a higher (and more beneficial) gear can be achieved by briefly taking your foot off the accelerator.

Tip 2: Stick to high-speed highways

Now you’ve reached cruising velocity, stay there. Nothing makes your engine thirstier than braking and re-accelerating. This is why it’s greedier at lower, variable speeds in-city compared to the higher, constant speeds of the highway. So when possible, choose highways instead of urban roads.

Have to go through heavy traffic in-town? Keep your distance from other cars and anticipate traffic movement, two tips that also save on brakes and tire wear. This helps cut down how much coming-to-a-complete-stop you’ll have to do, which in turns saves fuel.

Tip 3: Don’t coast to a stop in neutral

Remember when grandpa told you to let your vehicle coast in neutral because the reduced load on the engine would save gas? That hasn’t been true for at least 20 years, since while , yes, modern vehicles are designed to shut off their fuel supply when decelerating, they only do so if a gear is engaged.

You can test this one out on some new cars: with the on-board computer set to show instantaneous consumption, go into neutral gear. You’ll see a bit of fuel wasted, as if you were idling. Coasting could also adversely affect revs when you go back into gear, and full-on “free-wheeling” runs the risk of keeping you from reacting quickly in the case of an emergency where you might need to accelerate.

Tip 4: Keep your speed at a nice even 100 km/h

If you really want to save substantial money at the gas pump, don’t drive at 120 km/h on the highway. We’re not talking about avoiding fines for breaking the law, we’re talking about another set of laws — the laws of physics, which stipulates that the aerodynamic drag on your car at 120 km/h causes your car to burn at least 20 per cent more fuel than it would at 100 km/h.

If you commute along at least 50 km/h of highway per day in a vehicle with average-for-Canada fuel efficiency, this simple difference in speeds can save you around $400 per year (at an assumed $1.10 per litre for fuel). Double that if you drive a bigger SUV.

Tip 5: Don’t rely on adaptive cruise control

Your car’s cruise control is great for maintaining a steady speed on highway, helping save an average of seven per cent on gas, and at max, twice as much. That said, modern adaptive cruise control systems can negatively affect fuel mileage in high-traffic situations because they constantly alter your speed to match the car ahead. In those situations, it’s often better if you take control of the throttle.

Cruise control also might not be your best bet when roads are up hill and down; a system struggling to maintain a given speed on hilly terrains will not maximize your fuel efficiency. In those cases, not only you should forget about cruise control, but you should go with the flow, even if it means resisting the temptation to floor the accelerator. Rather, nurse your fuel consumption by being slight and gradual with pedal application, in tune with a low-RPMs-momentum.

Admittedly, your trip uphill might take a little longer, but you’ll catch up on the downhill letting your car coast – not in neutral, remember – while you mind the speed limits, of course.

Tip 6: Buy a block heater

If your car doesn’t have a block heater already, get one, and use it every time the temperature drops below zero. Every component of your car that needs to be warmed – the engine, its fluids, etc. – will get to temp faster. Warmer oil means less wear on your engine, savings in fuel consumption and reduced emissions.

How much can you save at the pump if you install a block heater? More or less the cost of a daily coffee. Indeed, CAA-Quebec did some experiments with vehicles it did and didn’t plug in. Over a two-month period at an average temperature of -10 degrees Celsius, the heated cars saw 15 per cent less fuel consumption for the first 20 kilometers of driving. Some vehicles showed a whopping 33-per-cent improvement.

To save energy overall, connect your block heater to a timer so it only starts three or four hours before your morning departure. Leaving it on longer turns your gas savings into wasted electricity.

Tip 7: Keep your tires inflated

We won’t repeat how and when you should check your tires’ pressure — that’s a topic we’ve already covered before. But we’ll tell you why you should. For every temperature drop of 6 degrees Celsius, your tires lose 1 psi of pressure.

Mother Nature sends us a cold front? If you haven’t topped off your tires recently, that snap could see them underinflated by roughly eight psi (56 kPa), at which point you’re wasting about four per cent more fuel, says Natural Resources Canada. In the long run, not only will you be frittering away pennies at the pump, you’ll be cutting down the life expectancy of your tires by up to 10,000 km, the government body says.

So when’s the last time you checked your tires’ pressure? If you don’t remember, you’re among the one-third of Canadian drivers, says tire industry research, who likely has at least one tire underinflated by more than 10 per cent.

Tip 8: Mind where you park

The last time you went to the shopping mall, where did you park? Did you start at the entrance then zig-zag down the rows searching for the spot? When you found it, did you drive in nose-first? Know that you would have saved gas – and time – if you started your hunt in a more remote corner of the lot full of spots, especially if you found a space you could leave without backing up from.

It’s a small savings, but every little bit helps — and if you’re able, the exercise walking to the store entrance isn’t bad either.

Tip 9: Lighten your load

This tip won’t break the bank either, but sort through the stuff you leave in your car. That old hockey bag, that sacks of de-icing salt, that old box of books you keep forgetting to donate — they don’t weigh a lot on their, but altogether, getting rid of them may save you gas. Every 25 kg of extra mass increases the fuel consumption of a mid-size car by about one per cent.

Hypermilers” maximizing their economy will go as far as unbolting their rear seat, but we’ll stop short of that and other controversial techniques they employ.

Tip 10: Try not to idle so much

You already know it, but idling does little but waste gas. We’re talking between a quarter and a half-litre for every 10 minutes in a car going… nowhere. (That’s just one good reason a block heater works better than a remote starter.)

Natural Resources Canada says, balancing “factors such as fuel savings, emissions and component wear,” you should shut off your engine if you’re going to be stopped for more than 60 seconds. There is one exception, and that’s if you’re in traffic. Don’t turn off your engine on the road like that, just try to avoid said congestion.

Use the radio traffic reports to your benefit, try Google Maps or Waze, choose less-known and -crowded roads, whatever. Anything’s better than watching your on-board computer undo your hard-earned low-fuel-consumption average after sitting five minutes in bumper-to-bumper traffic.

Source: https://driving.ca/features/feature-story/10-ways-slightly-changing-your-driving-can-save-big-bucks-on-your-fuel-bill

Why oversharing on social media might be overrated.

Sharing a photo of your engagement ring or honeymoon is tempting, but perhaps unwise.

In October 2016, Kim Kardashian was in Paris for Fashion Week when five armed men broke into her hotel room and made off with almost $10 million in jewellery. How did they know that at that exact moment the star was alone in her hotel room without her bodyguard? Easy. All they had to do was to check social media to track her movements.

Of course, not all of us are walking around the ritziest areas of Paris with a 18.88-carat diamond on our finger. But if you’re not careful, the tracks you leave on social media can reveal a great deal to someone with bad intentions—where you live, what valuables are in your possession, your movements, etc.

study conducted with 50 ex-burglars in the UK found that 78% of them used social media to identify houses whose owners were absent.

Troubling? Here’s a little guide to help protect you.

Social media and break-ins: top mistakes to avoid

1. Revealing your address

Never post photos of the front of your home or any detail that could give a clear indication of where you live (like the house number). Are you putting your apartment up for rent on a site like Kijiji or Craigslist? Settle for indicating the neighbourhood instead of the full address. This way you’ll avoid taking inventory of all your valuables and making them available to just about anyone.

2. Showing where you are

Avoid telling everyone where you are by doing check-ins or using geolocation features on social media platforms for every move you make. Remember, if your profiles are public, then the data is, too! Also check the settings on your mobile device to make sure that the geolocation feature isn’t permanently activated. Otherwise, a simple photo will allow you to be localized, owing to the GPS data contained in the file.

3. Sharing your vacation photos… while you’re still on vacation

Nothing says your house is unattended more than a photo of your toes in the sand in Punta Cana. Wait until you get home to share your memories, just like in the good old days. Yes, it’s hard. But you’ll be protecting yourself from those who would take advantage of your absence and relieve you of your valuables.

4. Displaying your riches on social media

You’ve decided to treat yourself to the watch of your dreams or start a contemporary art collection? Congratulations. But it would be much wiser to not show such things off on your social media accounts, even if they’re private. After all, you wouldn’t share your stock market earnings report!

Source: https://www.intact.ca/blog/en/why-oversharing-on-social-media-might-be-overrated.html

Aviva to start using credit info as auto rating factor in this province.

Aviva Insurance Company of Canada and Traders General Insurance Company have permission to use consumers’ credit information as an auto rating factor, the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board announced Monday.

Insurers are specifically prohibited from using credit information as an auto rating factor in both Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador, the NSURB noted.

But in Nova Scotia, Aviva and Traders (which is part of the Aviva group) proposed to add a “responsibility factor.” This means Aviva and Traders would use customer credit information as a new rating factor. Before giving Aviva the green light, NSURB considered whether current Nova Scotia regulations, which do not specifically prohibit the practice, nonetheless preclude auto insurers from using credit scores to rate auto.

The board considered Section 2 of Nova Scotia Regulation 183/2003, Matters Considered in Automobile Insurance Rates and Risk-Classification Systems Regulations, which says a rating factor may not be subjective, arbitrary, contrary to public policy, or one that “bears little or no relationship to the potential risk to be assumed by the insurer.”

In giving Aviva the go-head, NSURB took into account Aviva’s assurance that a customer would not be required to provide credit information in order to obtain insurance.

“A customer may be able to obtain a better rate if [credit rating] information is provided, but won’t be denied insurance if they do not. Considering all of this, and in the absence of specific evidence providing a justification for doing otherwise, the board finds that approving the proposed rating variable would not be contrary to public policy,” NSURB member Stephen McGrath wrote for the board in its ruling.

The board ordered Aviva and Traders to provide an update on whether experience emerges as expected for the responsibility factor when they start the next round of rate approvals this December.

In Ontario, insurers may use credit scores to rate home insurance but not auto. The Insurance Brokers Association of Ontario opposes the use of credit scores to rate home or auto insurance. IBAO has said in the past that it is not clear to brokers exactly how the credit scores are used and that credit rating has nothing to do with the risk that is being covered.

For their part, insurers tend to argue there is a statistical correlation between how insureds manage their personal finances, as represented by the consumer credit score, and the likelihood that they will have to make an insurance claim. For example, if insureds are careful managing their finances, they are also more likely to be diligent in other areas of their lives, such as doing regular maintenance and upkeep on their personal property, as insurance company CEOs have explained the correlation to Canadian Underwriter in the past.

In Nova Scotia, Aviva supplied confidential data supporting its argument that credit information is predictive of risk in property insurance and that this would carry over to auto insurance, McGrath wrote.

Get a quote 24 hours a day; www.24webquote.comhttp://www.24webquote.com

Source: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/legislation-regulation/aviva-to-start-using-credit-info-as-auto-rating-factor-in-this-province-1004173831/

Ins and Outs of Travel Insurance Amid Coronavirus Outbreak.

VANCOUVER – Travellers nervous about globe-trotting during the novel coronavirus outbreak may be eligible to receive a refund for cancelling their travels, say insurance experts, but it depends on the destination, their insurance policy and other factors.

“I think in any case of sort of an epidemic like this, it’s really an evolving situation and every day is different, something new happens,” said Joan Weir, director of health and disability policy for the Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association. CLHIA represents 99 per cent of the country’s life and health insurance companies, according to its website.

Travel insurers watch the unfolding situation very carefully, she said, and the association is frequently checking in with all its members about what they’re experiencing.

There are now more than 31,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus, which originated in Wuhan, China, according to the World Health Organization.

The bulk of these are in China, where there have also been 637 deaths. Across 24 other countries, there are 270 confirmed cases and one death. There are five confirmed cases in Canada.

The WHO declared the outbreak a global health emergency in late January.

The Canadian government issued a Level 3 advisory for China, asking Canadians to avoid non-essential travel. There is only one higher level, which advises travellers to avoid all travel.

The government recommends people avoid travelling to Hubei Province, where Wuhan city is located. The province has recorded 22,112 of China’s 31,211 coronavirus cases, according to the WHO.

As soon as the Canadian government declares a Level 3 or 4 travel advisory, a person may cancel their upcoming trip and their insurance should cover any lost expenses, said Weir.

“You’d have to submit receipts,” she said, but travellers should receive refunds for flights, hotels and other costs.

Trips booked before the government issues these advisories are often covered by travel insurance, said an emailed statement from the insurance company RSA Canada.

“Trips booked after this point are not eligible for medical coverage or trip cancellation/interruption coverage.”

Allianz Global Assistance Canada, which declined to comment due to “how quickly the current coronavirus is evolving and the changing advisories” from Canada’s government and others, posted a notice on its website to customers about the outbreak indicating booking timing mattered for coverage eligibility.

People travelling to China whose trip cancellation benefits kick in if the government issues a Level 3 advisory would be eligible to submit a claim if they purchased insurance before Jan. 29, when the government issued its advisory, according to the statement.

For those who do qualify, it doesn’t matter whether their trip is next week or in six months, said Weir.

However, the destination matters. While 24 countries have confirmed coronavirus cases, Canada’s travel advisory applies only to China. That means a person who feels uncomfortable travelling to any of the other countries won’t be able to get a refund for cancelling their trip, she said.

That is, unless they purchased what’s known as cancel-for-any-reason insurance, she said, which does exactly what the name implies.

Those who haven’t purchased any travel insurance may still be able to secure a refund, Weir noted, as many major credit cards offer some kind of coverage.

“But it depends on which credit card you have and what the benefits are,” she said. “So it’s good to know what your credit card covers for trip cancellation, for trip health, all that.”

For instant quote and purchase on travel insurance, visit www.24webquote.com

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 7, 2020.

Source: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/claims/ins-and-outs-of-travel-insurance-amid-coronavirus-outbreak-1004173736/

How Often Should You Wash Road Salt off Your Car?

If we are headed for another economic downturn (to say nothing of the subprime car loan bubble bursting) it’s more important than ever to keep what you have now in peak condition. Who knows what our financial or living situations will look like after the next big one hits. You may wonder if you can afford all the little upkeep items you do for your car, but what you really should be asking is this: Can you afford not to do those things?

There’s one big thing you can take care of now before it becomes a huge problem later, and that’s rust. It’s not a problem for our friends in the warm weather states where they don’t salt the roads—bless their hearts—but it’s a huge issue for cars that operate in cold climates. Once rust takes hold it spreads fast and is very difficult to counter. The best offense against rust is a defense, which is washing your car often when the roads are salted.

Salt, as you may know, is used on roads to melt snow and ice. But it’s horrible for steel because it accelerates the oxidation process. I know the slow-motion destructive power of road salt firsthand. It’s little wonder; my own home state of Michigan spends $24 million on 500,000 tons of road salt last year alone, the Detroit Free Press reports.

A tie rod in my first car, a 1995 Dodge Avenger, rotted through while I was driving it. Thankfully I escaped unharmed, but by then it was either spend $1,500 to repair a car worth maybe that same amount, or sink that cash into a long-term car loan. Now, as then, is not the time to be taking out loans. Now is the time for protecting what you have.

The easiest way to preserve your car is to become a neat freak. Wash it early and wash. It. Often. But how often?

Washing right after a snow is your best bet, according to the New York Times, not to mention good, old-fashioned, common sense. The weather report is really your best friend here. Try to wash your car the first snow-free day you can for maximum impact.

This guide in HowStuffWorks recommends drivers wash their cars every two weeks, but more if salt is involved:

Most experts recommend washing your car every two weeks or so throughout the year as a general rule. If you live in an area with a lot of salt — either from a nearby ocean or from salt trucks on the winter roads — you probably should wash it more, as salt can corrode the metal and cause rust.

Those who spend a lot of time driving through the backcountry should give their car a little more TLC, as well. The aforementioned bird business is acidic enough to eat through your car’s paint job if it’s left too long. Same goes for dead bugs and tree sap, so they should be washed off as necessary.

Your car can go longer between washes depending if you don’t drive it every day, or you keep it in a garage and out of the elements.

So yes, once a week should be the rust prevention goal.

Even once-weekly washes can go a long way towards preserving the structural integrity of your car, and don’t discount the importance of waxing and undercoat. Is that a lot of effort in the cold? Sure. But if we truly are stepping off of a cliff and down into an economic precipice, you might just find yourself with plenty of free time soon anyway.

Source: https://jalopnik.com/how-often-you-should-really-wash-road-salt-off-your-car-1831398962

Are you making these password mistakes?

From leaving passwords written on sticky notes laying around to using simple passwords to not using proper technology to secure client data, employees and companies still have much to learn about data security, according to a recent report. And with new research showing that cyber incidents are the top global risk for businesses, the blunders highlighted are a lesson in securing personal, corporate and client data.

Dashlane, a credential management company that stores and manage passwords through a desktop or mobile app, recounted the biggest mistakes companies and people made over the last year when it came to securing various accounts via a password in its annual Worst Password Offenders list.

Its top offender was Facebook, which made two critical mistakes from which all companies can learn. The company admitted that it not only exposed passwords of hundreds of millions of users internally to its employees, it also breached user privacy by asking for the email passwords of new users and harvesting contacts without consent. Facebook also violated security best practices by storing account passwords in its internal data storage system for years in plain text.

The tech giant then left a server unprotected – meaning, without a password – leaving 400 million users’ phone numbers and record exposed.

Facebook’s series of security blunders kept Google in second place for the year as the company admitted that it, similarly to Facebook, had stored passwords as plain text … since 2005.

Some of the worst mistakes weren’t done by corporations, according to Dashlane, as people were also inadvertently exposing their own passwords. Their mistakes are also a lesson for many others.

For example, how many people in your office have a password on a sticky note attached to their computer or desk that anyone walking by could see? Dashlane called out actress Lisa Kudrow who posted a photo of an article about an upcoming role. But included in the photo was a password written on a sticky note attached to her computer monitor.

Simple passwords continue to be a thorn in the side of security experts. U.S. Congressman Lance Gooden was caught on camera unlocking his phone with the code “777777.” Talk show host Ellen DeGeneres admitted that her password skills were lacking following a hack of her Instagram account. She was using the password “password.”

Dashlane recommends the following tips to secure accounts:

  • Use a different password for every account. “Password reuse is an epidemic. Repeating the same password across your accounts is a lot like using the same key for your house or your car,” the company said.
  • Use two-factor identification. It adds an extra layer of security by using two of three verification methods, such as your password, biometrics and a smart card.

Source: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/insurance/are-you-following-these-password-blunders-1004172791/

Wet, cold, and dark: Environment Canada names Top 10 weather events of 2019

Wet. Cold. In the dark. And puzzled.

That about sums up how the weather in 2019 left Canadians feeling, says David Phillips, Environment Canada’s chief meteorologist.

“It’s almost as if normal doesn’t happen any more.”

What do you make of a year that saw thunder at the North Pole and farmers needing drought and flood insurance on the same crop? A year that had seven straight months of freeze in southern Canada at the same time the Arctic was so warm it lifted the country’s average temperature to above normal?

And one that dumped a winter’s worth of snow during harvest and destroyed Halloween?

“It’s almost as if the climate was wobbling all over the place,” Phillips says.

When he began compiling Canada’s yearly Top 10 weather stories 24 years ago, Phillips used to have to scratch and claw to eke out the list. The challenge now is the opposite.

On Wednesday, he released his list again.

“Another record-setting Ottawa River flood” is at the top. Three years after what was supposed to be the flood of the century, more than 6,000 homes were flooded or threatened in April after the river broke water level records by 30 centimetres.

Montreal declared a state of emergency. Ottawa’s Chaudiere Bridge closed. Hundreds of people laid sandbags to keep the water from streets and homes. Two died, one in Ontario and one in Quebec.

Hurricane Dorian – the worst of several damaging Atlantic storms in 2019 – came second. Even after wreaking destruction on the Bahamas, the storm had enough juice left to uproot century-old trees and toss fishing vessels onto the beach in the Maritimes.

Winds reached 157 km/h. Up to 190 millimetres of rain fell.

Eighty per cent of homes and businesses in Nova Scotia and nearly half a million Atlantic Canadians lost power.

On the Prairies, it was snow – in the wrong place and at the wrong time. Calgary got 32 centimetres at the end of September and slogged through the greatest depth of it on the ground in 65 years.

Snow and rain beat down crops and delayed harvest for weeks across the entire grain belt. In Winnipeg alone, snow damaged more than 30,000 trees on public land.

More than 6,000 people had to be evacuated from their First Nations communities. At the peak of an early October storm, 250,000 people were without power.

Nor was the wet limited to the West. Torrential rain forced 20 Quebec municipalities to postpone Halloween until the next day.

It seemed particularly cruel after a winter during which southern Alberta was 14 C colder than normal and the British Columbia coast 9 C below average.

And summer never seemed to show up. Edmonton had 55 days of rain between June and August, the second-most on record.

Meanwhile, the Arctic was warm. And not just by Arctic standards.

In July, the remote Canadian Forces station Alert at the top of Ellesmere Island reached 21 C, warmer than Victoria. In Inuvik, N.W.T., temperatures were above normal every single day between Sept. 1 and Nov. 11. Sea ice was so late and unstable in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, that at least two Inuit travelling parties fell through, but survived.

For several years, says Phillips, weather extremes have been the story. Don’t expect that to stop.

“It’s the wildness of it, the variability of it, that is really the mark of climate change,” he says. “It’s almost as if it’s a wild card out there.

“If we look forward, I just don’t see it getting any quieter, any calmer, any less disruptive.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 18, 2019.

Source: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/insurance/wet-cold-and-dark-environment-canada-names-top-10-weather-events-of-2019-1004172017/

Out of country OHIP cut has Windsor-Essex travellers worried

Basic OHIP benefits for out of country travel are set to be discontinued on Jan. 1, 2020

Basic OHIP benefits for out of country travel are set to be discontinued on Jan. 1, 2020.

Windsorites are able to travel to Detroit so easily that many don’t think of obtaining out-of-country health insurance.

At the moment, Ontario’s OHIP insurance system covers $400-per-day for out-of-country inpatient treatments, with an additional $50-per-day for emergency outpatient and doctor services.

But that’s set to change on Jan. 1, 2020, when only kidney dialysis will be covered up to a maximum of $210 per day when out of the country.

Dina Mejalli, a partner at the Greg Monforton and Partners law firm who has helped Windsor clients obtain legal representation in the U.S. in liabilty claims due to accidents, said health care costs can be astronomical.

Mejalli said many snowbirds have lost their company benefits and now rely on private insurers.

“So their fear now is their premiums are going to increase because the Ontario government is cutting their minimal provision of benefits,” said Mejalli.

Windsor residents Martha and Dennis Willis live in Fort Myers, Fla. during the winter months. They lost their out-of-province benefits through their General Motors pensions, and now they’re worried their private insurance premiums will increase with the loss of OHIP coverage.

“Even travel in general is expensive. So now add the cost of out-of-province coverage on it and everything else that’s going to impact not even snowbirds but everybody I think,” said Martha Willis, from her home in Florida.

Sarah Hupalo, a travel agent with Goliger’s Travel Plus, said approximately $60 or $70 gets you one years’ worth of travel insurance at her organization. She said the price of the insurance sold by her company won’t increase because of the OHIP cut.

“Anything can happen and it’s very expensive. A 15-minute ambulance ride can be $10,000,” said Hupalo.

Waseem Jarjis is a law student at the University of Windsor who is enrolled in a joint program with the University of Detroit Mercy. He travels back and forth regularly, and thinks he might be covered under the Detroit university but isn’t certain.

“It might be nice to check my coverage now that these changes are coming about and see what I would have to do in that situation,” said Jarjis.

Windsor Regional Hospital sees more than 20 people each year who have come back from the U.S. after needing medical treatment there.

They believe American hospitals will discharge Canadians more quickly now that some OHIP coverage is drying up.

“Sometimes we find that insurance companies will exhaust the service in the US, so I think now with the changes that will be impacting the people of Ontario, I think we will see patients needing to come back sooner,” said Dr. Gina Bulcke, director of organizational effectiveness at Windsor Regional Hospital.

The province has already urged residents to get additional coverage sooner rather than later, because service costs covered by OHIP that pays for services in the U.S. isn’t usually enough.

Corrections

  • A previous version of this story reported that out-of-province OHIP coverage is set to change on Jan. 1, 2020. Instead, out-of-country coverage is set to change on that date. The story has been updated to reflect these facts.Dec 05, 2019 2:53 PM ET

Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/ohip-ontario-windsor-snowbirds-insurance-health-care-united-states-1.5384750?fbclid=IwAR1byGhguRX9A7MYB6cHvNmPww5IR0uDJM4qDCL0KJxOGETnW9l8vQL6boc

10 Ways to Save on Car Insurance

When it comes to insurance, you don’t want to cut corners — but you don’t want to break the bank, either. Whether you already have car insurance or you’re in the market for a new policy, check out these money-saving tips to help you get the best price.

  1. Study up. If you’re a brand new driver, discuss with your broker the benefits of completing a certified drivers’ education class.
  2. Embrace your age. Insurance companies want to insure good, experienced drivers who have a lower risk of getting into a collision. Most insurance companies will offer discounts or reduced premiums to drivers above a certain age.
  3. Pick the right make and model. When you’re trying to choose a vehicle that will cost less to insure, it’s about more than just the vehicle’s price. In fact, a more expensive vehicle with higher safety ratings and more security features may cost less to insure than a less expensive vehicle that tends to experience more insurance claims, even though the more expensive vehicle would cost more to repair or replace. Learn more about how your vehicle’s make and model can affect the price of your insurance.
  4. Think about security. After-market security devices (like steering-wheel locks and alarm systems) are just one of many ways to prevent car theft. Installing an after-market anti-theft device could get you a discount on car insurance, too.
  5. Get winter ready. Depending on where you live, your insurer might give you a discount for using approved winter tires.
  6. (Don’t) go the distance. The more you drive, the greater your risk of having an accident — so the distance that you drive your car on an annual basis could affect your premium. Consider leaving your car behind and riding your bike, taking public transit, or working from home to help reduce your mileage and possibly lower your premium. Just don’t forget to tell your broker that you’ve made a change to your driving habits!
  7. Be a better driver. This might be a no-brainer, but tickets and convictions can have a negative effect on your insurance rates. Tickets and convictions tend to stay on your record for at least three years, so you may be paying a higher premium for a while. The solution? Slow down, obey traffic laws, and stay on the right side of the law. 
  8. Ask if you can exclude high-risk drivers from your policy. If you have high-risk drivers in your household, sometimes it’s a good idea to exclude them from your policy so you won’t be penalized with a higher premium. If they won’t be driving your vehicle, ask your broker if it’s possible to exclude them from your policy coverages.
  9. Go for a higher deductible. Generally speaking, when you buy your car insurance policy, the higher you set your deductible, the lower your insurance premium will be. The key, of course, is to choose a deductible that you can afford to pay in the event of a claim, so check out your budget and find the balance that works for you.
  10. Bundle up. Whether you have more than one vehicle to insure or some other opportunity to combine policies (like car plus home or tenant insurance, for instance), you’ll likely see some savings. Just like your TV, Internet, and home phone provider, insurance companies reward customers with multi-policy discounts.

At the end of the day, you’re looking for the best coverage at a reasonable price, and there’s no one more qualified to help you find it than your insurance broker. Let them do the legwork and advise you on policies in your price range. Connect with a licensed broker today.

Source: https://www.economical.com/en/blog/economical-blog/august-2016/start-the-car-tips-to-save-on-car-insurance

Home Insurance Coverage You May Not Know About…

Most home insurance clients don’t know they could be covered for identity theft, Top Broker Summit attendees heard Monday.

“On the personal lines side, there have been a number of companies in Canada that have offered identity theft coverage for 10, 12 or 13 years. I think most Canadians don’t know it’s available,” said Paul Kovacs, founder and executive director of the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction.

“Some insurance companies throw it in. Others charge for it. But it’s certainly not a topic that I think the public is aware of. Identity theft is a growing threat and there is an opportunity on the personal lines side to talk about the role of the industry,” Kovacs said while moderating a luncheon panel at Top Broker Summit, produced by Canadian Underwriter and held at the Ritz-Carlton in Toronto. “Most Canadians don’t know whether they have it or not.”

Identity theft is when a criminal uses a client’s personal information (such as a name, social insurance number, or credit card number), as defined by CAA Insurance, one of the many companies that offer identity theft protection with home insurance. In CAA’s case, the coverage can be added for $25 a year.

For business clients, cyber insurance can cover a variety of losses, such as legal costs and damages, if you are sued for a privacy breach. It can also cover the cost to restore or recover data caused by a breach, denial-of-service attack, or ransomware, Insurance Bureau of Canada reports.

What exactly gets covered depends on the individual policy.

“There is absolutely no standard,” said Patrick Bourk, principal and national cyber practice leader for Hub International Ontario, during the Top Broker Summit luncheon panel. “Every insurer will do things a little bit differently.”

Cyber is a profitable business for insurers, but it it’s also linked to a very high risk compared to other lines, said Kovacs.

Some insurers are concerned about a single catastrophic cyber loss that affects multiple victims, costing the industry billions of dollars’ worth of claims payouts, suggested Bourk.

Asked by Kovacs how he sees the cyber market in five to 10 years, Bourk suggested prices might increase as cyber losses mount. “I think there is going to be some insurers who will realize, ‘Okay, maybe this is not necessarily for our risk appetite,’” Bourk responded.

Also on the panel was Jacqueline Detablan, vice president of specialty at CNA Canada.

“How we underwrite those risks has changed significantly,” said Detablan, who was previously a vice president of financial lines at American International Group (AIG) Canada. “Back in the day, we would have a real IT engineer do a deep dive on almost every single risk. We still to that on more complex risks.

“But [now] it’s more of a volume play, because you are going to have losses and you need to have a larger pool of premiums to cover those losses.”

Source Article: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/insurance/the-home-insurance-coverage-your-clients-dont-know-about-1004171210/