Are you making these password mistakes?

From leaving passwords written on sticky notes laying around to using simple passwords to not using proper technology to secure client data, employees and companies still have much to learn about data security, according to a recent report. And with new research showing that cyber incidents are the top global risk for businesses, the blunders highlighted are a lesson in securing personal, corporate and client data.

Dashlane, a credential management company that stores and manage passwords through a desktop or mobile app, recounted the biggest mistakes companies and people made over the last year when it came to securing various accounts via a password in its annual Worst Password Offenders list.

Its top offender was Facebook, which made two critical mistakes from which all companies can learn. The company admitted that it not only exposed passwords of hundreds of millions of users internally to its employees, it also breached user privacy by asking for the email passwords of new users and harvesting contacts without consent. Facebook also violated security best practices by storing account passwords in its internal data storage system for years in plain text.

The tech giant then left a server unprotected – meaning, without a password – leaving 400 million users’ phone numbers and record exposed.

Facebook’s series of security blunders kept Google in second place for the year as the company admitted that it, similarly to Facebook, had stored passwords as plain text … since 2005.

Some of the worst mistakes weren’t done by corporations, according to Dashlane, as people were also inadvertently exposing their own passwords. Their mistakes are also a lesson for many others.

For example, how many people in your office have a password on a sticky note attached to their computer or desk that anyone walking by could see? Dashlane called out actress Lisa Kudrow who posted a photo of an article about an upcoming role. But included in the photo was a password written on a sticky note attached to her computer monitor.

Simple passwords continue to be a thorn in the side of security experts. U.S. Congressman Lance Gooden was caught on camera unlocking his phone with the code “777777.” Talk show host Ellen DeGeneres admitted that her password skills were lacking following a hack of her Instagram account. She was using the password “password.”

Dashlane recommends the following tips to secure accounts:

  • Use a different password for every account. “Password reuse is an epidemic. Repeating the same password across your accounts is a lot like using the same key for your house or your car,” the company said.
  • Use two-factor identification. It adds an extra layer of security by using two of three verification methods, such as your password, biometrics and a smart card.

Source: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/insurance/are-you-following-these-password-blunders-1004172791/

Wet, cold, and dark: Environment Canada names Top 10 weather events of 2019

Wet. Cold. In the dark. And puzzled.

That about sums up how the weather in 2019 left Canadians feeling, says David Phillips, Environment Canada’s chief meteorologist.

“It’s almost as if normal doesn’t happen any more.”

What do you make of a year that saw thunder at the North Pole and farmers needing drought and flood insurance on the same crop? A year that had seven straight months of freeze in southern Canada at the same time the Arctic was so warm it lifted the country’s average temperature to above normal?

And one that dumped a winter’s worth of snow during harvest and destroyed Halloween?

“It’s almost as if the climate was wobbling all over the place,” Phillips says.

When he began compiling Canada’s yearly Top 10 weather stories 24 years ago, Phillips used to have to scratch and claw to eke out the list. The challenge now is the opposite.

On Wednesday, he released his list again.

“Another record-setting Ottawa River flood” is at the top. Three years after what was supposed to be the flood of the century, more than 6,000 homes were flooded or threatened in April after the river broke water level records by 30 centimetres.

Montreal declared a state of emergency. Ottawa’s Chaudiere Bridge closed. Hundreds of people laid sandbags to keep the water from streets and homes. Two died, one in Ontario and one in Quebec.

Hurricane Dorian – the worst of several damaging Atlantic storms in 2019 – came second. Even after wreaking destruction on the Bahamas, the storm had enough juice left to uproot century-old trees and toss fishing vessels onto the beach in the Maritimes.

Winds reached 157 km/h. Up to 190 millimetres of rain fell.

Eighty per cent of homes and businesses in Nova Scotia and nearly half a million Atlantic Canadians lost power.

On the Prairies, it was snow – in the wrong place and at the wrong time. Calgary got 32 centimetres at the end of September and slogged through the greatest depth of it on the ground in 65 years.

Snow and rain beat down crops and delayed harvest for weeks across the entire grain belt. In Winnipeg alone, snow damaged more than 30,000 trees on public land.

More than 6,000 people had to be evacuated from their First Nations communities. At the peak of an early October storm, 250,000 people were without power.

Nor was the wet limited to the West. Torrential rain forced 20 Quebec municipalities to postpone Halloween until the next day.

It seemed particularly cruel after a winter during which southern Alberta was 14 C colder than normal and the British Columbia coast 9 C below average.

And summer never seemed to show up. Edmonton had 55 days of rain between June and August, the second-most on record.

Meanwhile, the Arctic was warm. And not just by Arctic standards.

In July, the remote Canadian Forces station Alert at the top of Ellesmere Island reached 21 C, warmer than Victoria. In Inuvik, N.W.T., temperatures were above normal every single day between Sept. 1 and Nov. 11. Sea ice was so late and unstable in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, that at least two Inuit travelling parties fell through, but survived.

For several years, says Phillips, weather extremes have been the story. Don’t expect that to stop.

“It’s the wildness of it, the variability of it, that is really the mark of climate change,” he says. “It’s almost as if it’s a wild card out there.

“If we look forward, I just don’t see it getting any quieter, any calmer, any less disruptive.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 18, 2019.

Source: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/insurance/wet-cold-and-dark-environment-canada-names-top-10-weather-events-of-2019-1004172017/

Out of country OHIP cut has Windsor-Essex travellers worried

Basic OHIP benefits for out of country travel are set to be discontinued on Jan. 1, 2020

Basic OHIP benefits for out of country travel are set to be discontinued on Jan. 1, 2020.

Windsorites are able to travel to Detroit so easily that many don’t think of obtaining out-of-country health insurance.

At the moment, Ontario’s OHIP insurance system covers $400-per-day for out-of-country inpatient treatments, with an additional $50-per-day for emergency outpatient and doctor services.

But that’s set to change on Jan. 1, 2020, when only kidney dialysis will be covered up to a maximum of $210 per day when out of the country.

Dina Mejalli, a partner at the Greg Monforton and Partners law firm who has helped Windsor clients obtain legal representation in the U.S. in liabilty claims due to accidents, said health care costs can be astronomical.

Mejalli said many snowbirds have lost their company benefits and now rely on private insurers.

“So their fear now is their premiums are going to increase because the Ontario government is cutting their minimal provision of benefits,” said Mejalli.

Windsor residents Martha and Dennis Willis live in Fort Myers, Fla. during the winter months. They lost their out-of-province benefits through their General Motors pensions, and now they’re worried their private insurance premiums will increase with the loss of OHIP coverage.

“Even travel in general is expensive. So now add the cost of out-of-province coverage on it and everything else that’s going to impact not even snowbirds but everybody I think,” said Martha Willis, from her home in Florida.

Sarah Hupalo, a travel agent with Goliger’s Travel Plus, said approximately $60 or $70 gets you one years’ worth of travel insurance at her organization. She said the price of the insurance sold by her company won’t increase because of the OHIP cut.

“Anything can happen and it’s very expensive. A 15-minute ambulance ride can be $10,000,” said Hupalo.

Waseem Jarjis is a law student at the University of Windsor who is enrolled in a joint program with the University of Detroit Mercy. He travels back and forth regularly, and thinks he might be covered under the Detroit university but isn’t certain.

“It might be nice to check my coverage now that these changes are coming about and see what I would have to do in that situation,” said Jarjis.

Windsor Regional Hospital sees more than 20 people each year who have come back from the U.S. after needing medical treatment there.

They believe American hospitals will discharge Canadians more quickly now that some OHIP coverage is drying up.

“Sometimes we find that insurance companies will exhaust the service in the US, so I think now with the changes that will be impacting the people of Ontario, I think we will see patients needing to come back sooner,” said Dr. Gina Bulcke, director of organizational effectiveness at Windsor Regional Hospital.

The province has already urged residents to get additional coverage sooner rather than later, because service costs covered by OHIP that pays for services in the U.S. isn’t usually enough.

Corrections

  • A previous version of this story reported that out-of-province OHIP coverage is set to change on Jan. 1, 2020. Instead, out-of-country coverage is set to change on that date. The story has been updated to reflect these facts.Dec 05, 2019 2:53 PM ET

Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/ohip-ontario-windsor-snowbirds-insurance-health-care-united-states-1.5384750?fbclid=IwAR1byGhguRX9A7MYB6cHvNmPww5IR0uDJM4qDCL0KJxOGETnW9l8vQL6boc

10 Ways to Save on Car Insurance

When it comes to insurance, you don’t want to cut corners — but you don’t want to break the bank, either. Whether you already have car insurance or you’re in the market for a new policy, check out these money-saving tips to help you get the best price.

  1. Study up. If you’re a brand new driver, discuss with your broker the benefits of completing a certified drivers’ education class.
  2. Embrace your age. Insurance companies want to insure good, experienced drivers who have a lower risk of getting into a collision. Most insurance companies will offer discounts or reduced premiums to drivers above a certain age.
  3. Pick the right make and model. When you’re trying to choose a vehicle that will cost less to insure, it’s about more than just the vehicle’s price. In fact, a more expensive vehicle with higher safety ratings and more security features may cost less to insure than a less expensive vehicle that tends to experience more insurance claims, even though the more expensive vehicle would cost more to repair or replace. Learn more about how your vehicle’s make and model can affect the price of your insurance.
  4. Think about security. After-market security devices (like steering-wheel locks and alarm systems) are just one of many ways to prevent car theft. Installing an after-market anti-theft device could get you a discount on car insurance, too.
  5. Get winter ready. Depending on where you live, your insurer might give you a discount for using approved winter tires.
  6. (Don’t) go the distance. The more you drive, the greater your risk of having an accident — so the distance that you drive your car on an annual basis could affect your premium. Consider leaving your car behind and riding your bike, taking public transit, or working from home to help reduce your mileage and possibly lower your premium. Just don’t forget to tell your broker that you’ve made a change to your driving habits!
  7. Be a better driver. This might be a no-brainer, but tickets and convictions can have a negative effect on your insurance rates. Tickets and convictions tend to stay on your record for at least three years, so you may be paying a higher premium for a while. The solution? Slow down, obey traffic laws, and stay on the right side of the law. 
  8. Ask if you can exclude high-risk drivers from your policy. If you have high-risk drivers in your household, sometimes it’s a good idea to exclude them from your policy so you won’t be penalized with a higher premium. If they won’t be driving your vehicle, ask your broker if it’s possible to exclude them from your policy coverages.
  9. Go for a higher deductible. Generally speaking, when you buy your car insurance policy, the higher you set your deductible, the lower your insurance premium will be. The key, of course, is to choose a deductible that you can afford to pay in the event of a claim, so check out your budget and find the balance that works for you.
  10. Bundle up. Whether you have more than one vehicle to insure or some other opportunity to combine policies (like car plus home or tenant insurance, for instance), you’ll likely see some savings. Just like your TV, Internet, and home phone provider, insurance companies reward customers with multi-policy discounts.

At the end of the day, you’re looking for the best coverage at a reasonable price, and there’s no one more qualified to help you find it than your insurance broker. Let them do the legwork and advise you on policies in your price range. Connect with a licensed broker today.

Source: https://www.economical.com/en/blog/economical-blog/august-2016/start-the-car-tips-to-save-on-car-insurance

Home Insurance Coverage You May Not Know About…

Most home insurance clients don’t know they could be covered for identity theft, Top Broker Summit attendees heard Monday.

“On the personal lines side, there have been a number of companies in Canada that have offered identity theft coverage for 10, 12 or 13 years. I think most Canadians don’t know it’s available,” said Paul Kovacs, founder and executive director of the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction.

“Some insurance companies throw it in. Others charge for it. But it’s certainly not a topic that I think the public is aware of. Identity theft is a growing threat and there is an opportunity on the personal lines side to talk about the role of the industry,” Kovacs said while moderating a luncheon panel at Top Broker Summit, produced by Canadian Underwriter and held at the Ritz-Carlton in Toronto. “Most Canadians don’t know whether they have it or not.”

Identity theft is when a criminal uses a client’s personal information (such as a name, social insurance number, or credit card number), as defined by CAA Insurance, one of the many companies that offer identity theft protection with home insurance. In CAA’s case, the coverage can be added for $25 a year.

For business clients, cyber insurance can cover a variety of losses, such as legal costs and damages, if you are sued for a privacy breach. It can also cover the cost to restore or recover data caused by a breach, denial-of-service attack, or ransomware, Insurance Bureau of Canada reports.

What exactly gets covered depends on the individual policy.

“There is absolutely no standard,” said Patrick Bourk, principal and national cyber practice leader for Hub International Ontario, during the Top Broker Summit luncheon panel. “Every insurer will do things a little bit differently.”

Cyber is a profitable business for insurers, but it it’s also linked to a very high risk compared to other lines, said Kovacs.

Some insurers are concerned about a single catastrophic cyber loss that affects multiple victims, costing the industry billions of dollars’ worth of claims payouts, suggested Bourk.

Asked by Kovacs how he sees the cyber market in five to 10 years, Bourk suggested prices might increase as cyber losses mount. “I think there is going to be some insurers who will realize, ‘Okay, maybe this is not necessarily for our risk appetite,’” Bourk responded.

Also on the panel was Jacqueline Detablan, vice president of specialty at CNA Canada.

“How we underwrite those risks has changed significantly,” said Detablan, who was previously a vice president of financial lines at American International Group (AIG) Canada. “Back in the day, we would have a real IT engineer do a deep dive on almost every single risk. We still to that on more complex risks.

“But [now] it’s more of a volume play, because you are going to have losses and you need to have a larger pool of premiums to cover those losses.”

Source Article: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/insurance/the-home-insurance-coverage-your-clients-dont-know-about-1004171210/

What stops this insurer from measuring effectiveness of winter tires?

More than half a million Manitoba motorists are taking advantage of a winter tire financing program, but the jury is still out on whether the program has reduced accident frequency or severity.

There are about 580,000 registered passenger vehicles in Manitoba, said Brian Smiley, a spokesperson for Manitoba Public Insurance. MPI has processed about 130,000 loans for winter tires under an incentive program, Smiley told Canadian Underwriter.

Now in its fifth year, the incentive program allows motorists to get low-interest loans (prime plus 2%) of up to $2,000 towards buying winter tires as well as towards some of the associated costs.

But MPI is not at the point yet when it can keep statistics on how effective winter tires are in reducing accident frequency or severity. “Studies suggest that until there’s an 80% or higher usage rate, accurate analysis is not possible,” said Smiley.

Different provinces take different approaches to winter tires. For example, winter tires are mandatory from Dec. 15 through March 15 in Quebec, while Ontario insurance regulations have required carriers to give discounts for winter tires since 2016. The exact discount and criteria vary among insurers in Ontario.

So can one conclude that if everyone had winter tires, claims costs would be a certain amount lower than if no one had winter tires?

“Such projections are difficult to calculate,” said Smiley. “While winter tires have their safety merits, the onus of road safety ultimately rests with the driver of the vehicle. For example, an impaired/texting driver can still get into a crash despite the fact that the vehicle is equipped with winter tires.”

In Manitoba, motorists can get low-interest loans if they are private passenger (not commercial) customers of MPI and are buying the tires for vehicles with gross weight of under 4,541 kg. They also must have no financing restrictions or outstanding payments on their MPI accounts.

The tires must have the Transport Canada snowflake symbol, so mud and snow (all-season) tires do not qualify. Transport Canada says tires marked “M + S” continue to provide safe all-weather performance but may not always be suitable for severe snow conditions.

MPI customers can  pay for their tires by making monthly, pre-authorized payments to MPI through their bank accounts.

Tire and Rubber Association of Canada has a series of videos that compare the difference between proper winter tires and summer tires.

The MPI program does not let clients borrow money to repair tires. It also does not provide loans to maintain and store tires, unless that is included as part of the initial cost. It also does not provide loans for the cost of switching tires,  unless included as part of the initial cost.

It does provide loans for the cost of several associated items – among them rims, addition of studs to tires (some limitations apply), mounting and balancing, wheel alignment, nitrogen fill, valve stems, shop supplies and applicable taxes and fees.

Source article: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/insurance/what-stops-this-insurer-from-measuring-effectiveness-of-winter-tires-1004170205/

Ontario Brokers Raise $23,000 for Women in Insurance Cancer Crusade

Toronto, ON, October 31, 2019/InsPress/ – The Insurance Brokers Association of Ontario (IBAO) and insurance brokers across the province raised $23,000 in support of the Women in Insurance Cancer Crusade (WICC)—an organization that supports cancer research and education. Fundraising took place at IBAO’s 99th Annual Convention last week in Toronto.

“We continue to learn about the key role WICC plays in mobilizing Canada’s insurance industry in the fight against cancer,” said IBAO President Jeff Gatcke. “Given our partnership with WICC Ontario—a new collaboration we announced earlier this year—we wanted to further align our largest event and platform with this important initiative. We couldn’t be more pleased with the outcome.”

WICC was founded in 1996 and has raised over $16.5 million since its reception. As a Community Partner of WICC Ontario, IBAO promotes WICC Ontario initiatives to its membership and the broker community at large through its communication channels.

“WICC is honoured not only to have partnered with IBAO through its Community Partnership but also to have been selected as IBAO’s charity of choice for this year’s Convention,” said Marilyn Horrick, Co-Chair, WICC Ontario. “Extending our reach for cancer research fundraising into the brokerage community is an incredible opportunity and would not have been possible without the IBAO. We’re moved by the generosity of Ontario’s brokers and we’re tremendously grateful for the support.”

Funds raised from IBAO’s 99th Annual Convention will support research initiatives across Canada.

– 30 –

The Insurance Brokers Association of Ontario (IBAO) is a not‐for‐profit association representing over 13,000 insurance brokers across Ontario.

Source article: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/inspress/ontario-brokers-raise-23000-for-women-in-insurance-cancer-crusade/

Windsor’s First Cannabis Store to Open November 1, 2019

Things should get rolling at Windsor’s first legal pot shop by the start of November.

Kyriakos (Kirk) Anastasiadis said Wednesday his new joint at 545 Ouellette Ave. should be past regulatory hurdles, renovated, stocked and open by Nov. 1.

“I’m just excited to get working on this and bringing some good business and positivity to the downtown Windsor core,” said Anastasiadis, 30, who owns several bars and restaurants in London.

Anastasiadis was one of 42 applicants selected in the most recent Ontario lottery last month to receive a retail pot store licence, assuming all the regulatory requirements are met.

A dozen of those applicants have since been disqualified for failing to submit required documents in time. Another one withdrew the application.

“I wasn’t disqualified, so that’s a good next step,” said Anastasiadis, who plans on moving to Windsor to run the store. “I got all my applications in, then the next step is they’re going to do an interview, and then it’s the build.”

As long as he passes the final inspections, Anastasiadis said he will be ready to go by the end of next month.

“In the application for the cannabis dispensary you have to propose a set date for inspection, and as of right now that is end of October, Nov. 1,” he said. “The AGCO is going to come in and do this inspection, then they’ll let you know if you’re ready to go or what changes you have to make to the store.”

One of his biggest jobs before November will be renovating the store.

“It’s a lot of cosmetic,” said Anastasiadis. “Rip out the floor and put a new floor in. Basically beautifying the place.”

The regulations require storeowners to have a vault for storing inventory, but Anastasiadis said that’s already taken care of.

“Being an old bank, there’s actually a vault built into it,” he said. “That takes a lot of the steps out of the way as long as the vault is up to code.”

Anastasiadis must officially receive his licence before buying inventory, but he said the product should arrive quickly once the order is in.

“They set you up with their wholesaler from the (Ontario Cannabis Store), then you put in your order,” he said. “They do weekly deliveries.”

That first order will likely be a big one.

“I believe the first order is allowed to be up to 100 kilos,” said Anastasiadis.

That includes all cannabis products from oils and mouth sprays to pre-rolled joints. Anastasiadis said he also plans to sell edibles once they hit the legal market.

#Windsorontario, #AandA, #Brokerisbest, #Cannabis, #Windsorpotshop

Source: https://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/windsors-first-legal-pot-shop-slated-to-open-nov-1

Electronic Pink Slips A Go

You can now show your proof of auto insurance electronically in Ontario

Pink auto insurance slips aren’t being eliminated yet, but new option being phased in over 1-year period.

Ontario drivers can now carry electronic proof of their auto insurance on their smartphones or other devices.

Finance Minister Rod Phillips said the pink paper insurance slip isn’t being eliminated yet, but being able to display the information on a phone will be more convenient for many drivers.

“We’ve all had enough paper in our lives, at least me, for one, I have experienced rummaging through the glove box, looking for that little pink slip,” Phillips said as he made the announcement on Thursday. “Well, as of today your rummaging days are over if you choose this electronic option.”

There will be a one-year phase-in period, when insurers will have to issue a paper card in addition to the electronic option if it is requested.Phillips said drivers in Alberta, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador can already display their proof of insurance electronically. 

“With the proliferation of mobile devices and apps and various add ons, it only makes sense that drivers in Ontario can  take advantage of the same options that drivers in other provinces can,” he said.

Drained battery, damaged screen no excuse

The electronic cards will feature safeguards that won’t allow them to be altered or edited, and privacy concerns are top of mind, Phillips said.

Drivers will be responsible for making sure their phone can display the proof of insurance, even with a poor signal, drained battery or damaged screen. The Trillium Automobile Dealers Association, speaking for Ontario’s new car dealers, welcomed the news.

“In this advanced, technological age we live in, there is no good reason why drivers must carry a paper copy for proof of insurance,” director of government relations Frank Notte said in a statement.

The Insurance Bureau of Canada said consumers have digital options in other sectors such as banking and retail, so auto insurers are pleased their customers will have the same choice.

“We look forward to working with the government on other measures that will improve the auto insurance system for drivers,” the insurance bureau’s Ontario vice-president Kim Donaldson said in a statement.

Electronic proof of insurance was one of a number of ways the government signalled in its spring budget that it was going to reform auto insurance.

The province is also reverting back to the default benefit of $2 million for those who are catastrophically injured in a collision, after it dropped to $1 million three years ago.

#Windsorontario, #AandA, #Brokerisbest, #cbcwindsor

Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/car-insurance-pink-auto-ontario-electronic-1.5271540

What’s the most dangerous form of driving? What do the telematics say?

When it comes to the most dangerous form of aggressive driving, speed stands above the rest as most likely to cause a crash.

Research from the University of Waterloo has found that speeding is more likely than hard braking, hard acceleration and hard cornering to cause a vehicle to crash. The university combed through 28 million trips recorded with telematics data to see that speeding led to more crashes than the other riskier behaviours. In fact, the other forms of aggressive driving were statistically insignificant when it came to collisions.

What does this mean for an insurance company? They should assess a driver’s risk based on how fast they drive.

“For insurance companies using this telematics data to assess who is a good risk and who isn’t, our suggestion based on the data is to look at speed, at people driving too fast,” said Stefan Steiner, a statistics professor in the university’s mathematics faculty.

The study now provides factual evidence that speed is a leading cause for crashes. Previously, this was just an assumption, said Allaa (Ella) Hilal, an electrical and computer engineering adjunct professor.

“Some of the results are no surprise, but prior to this we had a whole industry based on intuition,” she said. “Now it is formulated – we know aggressive driving has an impact.”

Phil Gibson, managing director of personal insurance at Aviva Canada, agreed. “This analysis and the conclusions of the researchers confirms what we’ve seen in our experience for years: drivers who speed are more likely to be involved in an accident. We (insurers) have historically used moving violations, like speeding tickets, in pricing and underwriting auto insurance, because they reflect an increase in the risk of a driver having an accident,” he told Canadian Underwriter.

There are still some unknowns, however, Steiner cautioned, such as the same vehicle being used by different drivers and that further research was needed to verify their results.

Still, the study could impact how telematics data is used by the insurance industry. Rather than judging risk based on age, location or gender, a look at a person’s driving data could determine their premiums.

Furthermore, Hilal noted, to the extent that drivers know their data is being tracked and therefore curb their risky driving behaviours, better driving could lead to better rates. “Having this information exposed and understood allows people to wrap their minds around their true risks and improve their driving behaviours,” she said. “We are super-pumped about its potential.”

Recently, insurance industry experts told Canadian Underwriter that distracted driving was their biggest concern for drivers as crashes rise. Aviva Canada said the total number of vehicles repaired was up 2.2% from 2017-18 in the provinces in which the company operates.

Blame was put on people using their cellphones while driving, as well as people being distracted by infotainment systems in the vehicles. Now compound distracted driving with aggressive behaviour and you have a potential recipe for disaster, Gibson said. “Any of those four aggressive driving behaviours (speeding, hard braking, hard acceleration and hard cornering) analyzed would be made much more dangerous if the driver is distracted in any way.”

Source: https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/insurance/whats-the-most-dangerous-form-of-driving-what-telematics-tells-us-1004167563/