Importance of Travel Insurance

Photo: Disney

Your Canadian insurance is almost certainly not valid outside Canada. Your provincial or territorial health plan may cover nothing or only a very small portion of the costs if you get sick or are injured while abroad. For more information, contact your provincial or territorial health authority.

Hospitals and clinics in some countries have been known to refuse to treat patients who become ill or who have had an accident and who do not have adequate travel health insurance or the money to pay their bills. You could face years of debt paying off the costs of treatment for an illness or accident you suffered abroad. The Government of Canada will not pay your medical bills.

“During a short vacation on a Caribbean island, a Canadian developed a severe form of pneumonia and had to be admitted to hospital. His health deteriorated, and he was transferred to intensive care and placed on a breathing machine for more than a month. Without insurance, he had to make arrangements with the hospital to pay a bill that amounted to more than $20,000.”

At A&A Insurance Brokers Ltd, we have trained professionals to provide you with the travel insurance you need to ensure you have a safe and relaxing holiday.

Source: https://travel.gc.ca/travelling/documents/travel-insurance

www.aandainsurance.ca

6 Tips to Boat Safety

  1. Keep your Pleasure Craft Operator (PCO) card with you. Federal regulations specify that anyone who operates a boat with a motor in Canada must have a PCO card.
  2. Before boating, check the weather forecast. Ensure there are no hazards, such as high winds or approaching thunderstorms.
  3. Plan ahead. Know where you are going. Getting lost on the water is no fun. Bring a map and tell someone where you are going and when you expect to return.
  4. Fill up the gas tank. Ensure that your boat has enough fuel for your outing. Keep tools, spare parts, a first-aid kit and other safety equipment – such as paddles, whistles and flares – on board.
  5. Ensure that every person has a lifejacket. The law requires boats to be equipped with a Canadian-approved lifejacket or PFD of an appropriate size for each person on board. Make sure your PFD is comfortable and allows for easy movement. Check that seams are intact and all snaps, belts and zippers work properly. Remember, bright colours are easier to spot in an emergency.
  6. Be responsible. Boat sober. Boats and booze don’t mix. Sun, wind, noise, glare, vibrations and motion can heighten the effect of alcohol on your balance, vision, judgment and coordination. Don’t allow a person who has consumed alcohol to operate a boat.

http://Source: http://www.ibc.ca/nu/home/recreational-properties/boat